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Shift Worker in Stress Shift workers are at risk of stress


Reviewed by
Dr. Pradip Chauhan

Working non-traditional hours is more common than you might think. In industrialized nations, up to 20% of workers work either night or rotating shifts, according to an editorial published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Doctors, paramedics, factory workers, security guards, jet workers . And so more all people who works I shifting duty faces a syndrome shifting duty syndrome.


Symptoms:

the leading one are

  • Improper sleep
  • Anxiety
  • Irritation
  • Headache

How to cope them?

Just follow the following rules, have a good sleep and you can better manage it!

If your job requires that you work the night shift or hours other than the traditional 9 to 5, you need to pay close attention to your sleep. These tips can help you get good sleep:

  • Avoid number of night shifts in row.
  • Avoid frequently rotating shifts.
  • Try to avoid long commutes that take time away from sleeping.
  • Keep your workplace brightly lighted to promote alertness. If you're working the night shift, expose yourself to bright light, such as that from special light boxes, lamps, and visors designed for people with circadian-related sleep problems, when you wake up. Circadian rhythms are the body's internal clock that tells us when to be awake and when to sleep. These rhythms are controlled by a part of the brain that is influenced by light. Fleming says that being exposed to bright light when you start your "day" can help train your body's internal clock to adjust.
  • Decrease amount of caffeine especially during late in shift.
  • Avoid bright light on the way home from work, which will make it easier for you to fall asleep once you hit the pillow. Wear dark, wraparound sunglasses and a hat to shield yourself from sunlight. Don't stop to run errands, tempting as that may be.
  • Stick to a regular sleep-wake schedule as much as you can.
  • Ask your family to limit phone calls and visitors during your sleep hours.
  • Use blackout blinds or heavy curtains to block sunlight when you sleep during the day. "Sunlight is a potent stimulator of the circadian rhythm," Fleming says. "Even if your eyes are closed, the sunlight coming into the room tells your brain that it's daytime. Yet your body is exhausted and you're trying to sleep. That discrepancy ... is not a healthy thing for the body to be exposed to."

For further information contact: www.eehealthbook.com

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